My Image
When, after much persuasion, the Church agreed to the carbon dating of the Shroud of Turin it was billed by the Media as Science v’s Religion. The world waited - some with baited breath. I had a close up view of what led up to the test and have some claim to responsibility for bringing it about. I will tell you the bare bones of my story here and why I believe a great injustice was done.

David Rolfe


The Shroud of Turin (below) is a linen cloth 4.4m long by 1.1 wide. It has a geometrical pattern of burns and patches caused by a known fire in 1532. It bears an image of a naked man who, according to forensic pathologists, has endured a crucifixion. The image, though clearly perceptible to the eye, is revealed in much more clarity when reversed into the negative image below. It remains a total enigma. Its charted history begins in 1355 but no one knows its origins though there are potential links with a known ancient cloth of similar description that disappeared from Constantinople 150 years earlier. It is a unique and multi-dimensional artefact in every sense of that word as you will discover. No one has been able to explain or reproduce the nano-metre thin discolouration of the surface fibres that forms the image.

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"Surely, on the basis of this evidence, there are grounds for an appeal."
Rowan Williams - Former Archbishop of Canterbury and now Master of Magdalen College, Cambridge.

Pope Benedict's last act before retirement was to order an unprecedented international televised exposition of the Shroud. My speculation is that it was his way of acknowledging that the C14 process had been handled badly.

My Image

A Bridge Between Faiths
My Image

The biggest Shroud event in the UK is currently held annually during the Jalsa Salana of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community which hosts Shroud scholars from around the world.
Left: Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad - Supreme Head of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community - in discussion with Barrie Schwortz, founder and editor of shroud.com. Centre, Amer Safir, editor of Review of Religions.




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